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The Neurocognitive Function and Neuroimaging Characteristics between Age-Associated Memory Impairment and Mild Cognitive Impairment
Korean J Clin Geri 2019 Jun;20(1):18-25
Published online June 30, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.15656/kjcg.2019.20.1.18
Copyright © 2019 The Korean Academy of Clinical Geriatrics.

Ji-Hye Kim1,2, Ji-Won Lee3

1Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Health promotion, Severance Check-up, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Received February 1, 2019; Revised March 19, 2019; Accepted April 4, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Background: Age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were considered to have a positive correlation with early dementia status, reflecting the decline in objective cognitive function. Studies results exploring the characteristics of AAMI and MCI remain mixed. We investigated the characteristics of AAMI and MCI using neuroimaging and neurocognitive function in healthy Korean adults.
Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed a total of 14 participants who visited single health promotion center. AAMI and MCI was defined via questionnaires. Participants were classified into three groups based on neurocognitive status: normal, AAMI, MCI. We conducted either Kruskal-Wallis or chi-square test to compare the neuroimaging characteristics between three groups; Mann-Whitney U test was applied for the within-group analysis. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to investigate the neurocognitive function between three groups.
Results: In the case of AAMI and MCI, there were partial metabolic decreases in various parts such as temporal lobe, frontal lobe, parietal lobe and cerebellum. Profound disparities in metabolic decrease in parietal lobe were observed among three groups (P=0.049). In the MMSE characteristics, MCI group showed marked deterioration in attention (P=0.030), and decreased in more various cognitive domains than AAMI group.
Conclusion: The distinct neuroimaging characteristics were observed among three groups. The deficit of neurocognitive function was more prominent in attention in MCI group.
Keywords : Age-Related Memory Disorders, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neuroimaging
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June 2019, 20 (1)