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Differences in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow between Mixed Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease
Korean J Clin Geri 2019 Jun;20(1):26-30
Published online June 30, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.15656/kjcg.2019.20.1.26
Copyright © 2019 The Korean Academy of Clinical Geriatrics.

Myeong-A Lee1, Hyeonseok Jeong2, In-Uk Song1

1Department of Neurology, Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea;
2Department of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
Received January 2, 2019; Revised February 18, 2019; Accepted February 25, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Background: Previous studies have suggested that mixed dementia (MD) has distinct characteristics of brain structure and function compared to other types of dementia such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the patterns of altered regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in MD remain elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the differences in rCBF between MD and AD patients.
Methods: Twent-seven MD patients and 27 AD patients in their early stages underwent brain technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography scans. Voxel-wise differences in rCBF between the two groups were examined using Statistical Parametric Mapping.
Results: MD patients presented lower rCBF in the superior/inferior frontal and lateral orbital gyri compared to AD patients (P<0.005). On the other hand, AD patients demonstrated lower rCBF in the amygdala and hippocampus compared to their counterparts (P<0.005).
Conclusion: The distinct characteristics of rCBF vary by underlying dementia pathology, MD and AD.
Keywords : Alzheimer disease, Mixed dementia, Regional cerebral blood flow, Single-photon emission computed tomography
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June 2019, 20 (1)